Chazda

About Chazda Albright

Chazda is a teacher, writer and designer from New Mexico, USA who has been living in Europe since 2002. Her writing has been published online and off in the fields of female sexuality and health, creative fiction, technical writing and children’s illustrated books. She’s a cofounder of GreatStorybook.com and is a strong advocate of creative thought and expression. In the German town of Homburg she privately tutors English for kids as well as Business English and Conversational English to adults. Contact Chazda HERE: *coach at chazda dot com* to arrange a Schnuppertag.

Better Parade Needed

If you look online for pictures from the Laternenfest Bad Homburg, any year, chances are good that they exclude pictures of the parade. This is for good reason: namely, no one really wants to remember it. Bad Homburg has a lot to offer, but strangely, the parade for the Laternenfest is at best shoddy, and […]

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Happy Palmtree for Kids

Reading a book to a group of kids – especially in this environment, where I am the American in a small German town, reading to a multi-cultural group of kids who are individually bilingual or trilingual – can be challenging. To say that anything goes is an understatement. There is no telling what a child […]

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Hey Mister, Want To Buy A Historic Landmark?

I come from a young country. America. So when I see a historic landmark was built in the 1700s, it amazes me. Just earlier today, I discovered that in my adoptive town of Bad Homburg, Germany, a special site is currently on the market. I feel both a sense of awe and befuddlement. Somehow, it […]

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Rund um Bicycles and Omelettes

 
In Bad Homburg there is always something to do. Sometimes it is right up my alley (as we say in the States – meaning it’s something that interests me a great deal), and sometimes, when I’m quite lucky, it is literally up my very own street.
As is traditional on May 1st, the big Eschborn-Frankfurt bicycle tournament (also known as Rund um den Finanzplatz) is on and fortunately, everything in Germany is shut down on this day because with such a massive quantity of people out and about on the streets, nothing at all would get done. My daughter and I moseyed along the Kaiser-Friedrich-Promenade (locally dubbed the KFP) and Höhestraße (which is the same street only not as wealthy), watching and waving to the cyclists as they sped past.  […]

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Spring Cleaning in Homburg

If you live in the center of town, or have visited the area recently, you may have noticed that our quiet little town has been pretty noisy lately. The sound of birds sweetly chirping as the sun rises is now met with the sound of metal beating and burrowing into stone pavers all up and down the main walkway, Louisenstrasse.
April 25th, Thursday morning. I stepped out of my favorite cafe, leaving my writing things and hot coffee on the table behind me, to go and see what on earth is all that ruckus? I was trying to write. I saw the crew of men, rough looking and muscled, wearing bright orange gear (as if you could miss them). They were working hard to rip up the walkway I enjoy every day. What they were doing looked rather interesting to me, so I took a picture. Just as I did so, a man with salt-and-pepper hair and suit pants approached me and asked me why I was photographing his men. […]

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Coffee and Amerikaner Cookies

 
Living in Bad Homburg is easy to do if you can afford it. Once you get here, you can relax and enjoy all the free things this town provides, things like good schools, an excellent public library, beautiful parks, the Louisenstraße and all the window-shopping you can handle. In the warm weather season, we get outdoor concerts, the parks become museums of modern art, and the street musicians come in droves (though the stout of heart stay and perform even in the snow).

Then there’s the farmer’s market, which comes every Tuesday and Friday. Those are special days for me. I can stroll along the busy walkway and inhale all the smells as I go: meats, cheeses, flowers, pastry, vegetables, more flowers and more vegetables. People chattering, exchanging, waving hello as they hurry past. Wonderful.
When I lived in Seattle, Washington, I learned to love coffee and espresso. If you didn’t know it already, Seattle holds the world record in two things: largest quantity of coffee bean sold per year worldwide and the largest quantity of sunglasses sold per year worldwide. The reason for these two trends is one-fold. The rain. It rains a lot in Seattle, pretty much every day. So people need a good kicker: caffeine; and they need sunglasses because on the few days a year when the sun does actually break through the clouds, no one can stand the glare of sunshine. They haven’t used their sunglasses in – maybe 312 days, have no idea where they might have put them, and so must quickly purchase a replacement pair to save their tender pupils. […]

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Von |18.04.2013|An American In Homburg, Kultur|5 Kommentare

A Love Story with Burnt 43a

This town, Bad Homburg, is my town. It’s where I feel at last at home, a foreign emotion for me – a foreigner to this place, I feel adopted. I will to a certain extent always be an outsider, or what Peter Mayle calls a permanent tourist, but Bad Homburg is the town that suits me best. It did not always strike me as the place where I belonged. It was not love at first sight. This was a slow cooking romance, the kind you read about in a classic bodice ripper novel, the kind where the damsel in distress wears a long gown with her breasts slightly exposed as the tall, dark and handsome man with bulging muscles holds her in his arms, pressing her close as her hair falls back. Bad Homburg was my knight in shining armor, one I initially held in great disdain.

In The Beginning, I Got Here
When I first moved to Germany in 2002 I didn’t like Bad Homburg at all. The way people drove their cars around town annoyed me to no end, the old moneyed ladies were snooty. Too many buildings, once grand 100 years ago, were falling apart. People were far too snobby about the place, I thought. Since then, I’ve grown to love this town with all its dents and come to recognize my first impressions of the place and the people in it as Culture Shock, as I felt very much the person who did not belong. I was the fish out of water. […]

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